New pop-up on Darby

EXCITING: MEET Restaurant at Honeysuckle has joined the pop-up game by opening The Chop Shop at Darby Street Automotive Services. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
Nanjing Night Net

What do a mechanic and Brazilian street food have in common? Nothing, really –until last Friday, that is, when MEET Restaurant Honeysuckle launchedThe Chop Shop at Darby Street Automotive Services.

The MEET food truck will serve authentic Brazilian street food at 67-79 Darby Street, Newcastle, on Fridays from 6pm. On Saturdays and Sundays it is open from 9am to 3pm, and 5pm to 9pm.

On the menu? Gourmet toasties –thinksmoked brisket, jalapeno, cheeseand bacon jam and a side of pickles; or BBQ vegetable, cheese and chimichurri –as well asspit-roasted meats.

“We were always fond of the idea of doing different street foodand this environment allows us to get a bit more creative with our menu,” MEET co-owner Mitchell Steel said.

“There will be times when we have prior commitments and may not be available every weekend, though, so there may be opportunities for other vendors to jump in and see what this creative space has to offer.”

On the moveChef Jamie Thomas has moved on from The Family Hotel in Newcastle West and opened Winnie’s Jamaican at Finnegan’s Hotel. He also has his finger in the pie at Town Hall Bistro, where his business partner Luke Smith is serving modern English cuisine to punters who can’t get enough of his lamb’s fry, ox tongue and offal dishes.

Thomas was executive chef at Drink’n’Dine in Sydney for five years and in charge ofall six of their restaurants, including Jamaican joint Queenies.

“I sold my shares in the Familyand it was all amicable. Jamaican ismy favourite food to cook and I love the whole vibe. The first week at Winnie’s went really well, especially the lunches, and we got great feedback. But I’m under no real pressure, I’m just taking my time getting it off the ground.”

Changes at StarThe Star Hotel has a new winter menu which is described as “smart casual” and “simple food done well”. Highlights include a choice of five burgers with salads, grazing plates, four pizzas and mains like crispy pork belly and 12-hour braised beef cheeks.Meal deals are still on offer throughout the week as well as an ever-changing $10 lunch menu–this week it’s pumpkin soup; bacon, chilli and spinach fettucine; beef stroganoff;and a Moroccan chicken burger.

Feeling Lucky?Time is running out to take advantage of the Lucky Hotel’s school holiday deal –purchase any main meal for lunch between Monday and Wednesday and receive a “Kids Meal” and ice-cream dessert for free.

Winning winesHerald wine writer John Lewis says Pokolbin’s winning Brisbane Wine Show wines are now available for sale: McWilliam’s Mount Pleasant 2009 Lovedale Vineyard Hunter Semillon, best mature white and best semillon, $90at Marrowbone Road winery, mountpleasantwines南京夜网.auand in shops;McWilliam’s Riverina-sourced Hanwood EstateTouriga, $25 at mcwilliamscellar南京夜网.au,in wine stores and at Hanwood Estate cellar door;and Poole’s Rock 2016 Tasmania Pinot Noir, best pinot noir, $45 at poolesrock南京夜网.au, at 576 De Beyers Roadand in wine stores.

Family Food FightChannel Nine is working on new prime-time cooking competitionFamily Food Fight, wheresix food-loving families from across the country will go head-to-head in the kitchen in a quest to find Australia’s top food family. Chef and restaurateur Matt Moran, pastry chef Anna Polyviou and Hayden Quinn will be the judges, with food writer and critic Tom Parker Bowles appearing as a guest judge.

Street food buzzThe Beehive at Honeysuckle has introduced Street Nights by the City’s Lights on Friday and Saturday nights, 5pm until late. Ten international street dishes will be on the menu for $10 a plate.

Christmas tapasFernleigh Cafe is feeling festive. This month they will be serving tapas with a Christmas in July theme – think coconut sugar pork skewers; slow-roasted Kleftico lamb with skordalia; and rum balls with Tasmanian whisky custard and chocolate bark. The cost is $45 per person (BYO, no corkage) and tickets are selling fast.

Pasta at SproutIf you haven’t tried Sprout Dining’s $10 pasta menu on a Monday night, you should. Choices include naked squid and scallop fettucini with rocket, garlic and olives dressed with a light tomato cream; chilli, chorizo and pumpkin tagliatelle with Napolitana sauce, confit garlic and Romesco; and pork bolognaise spaghetti with tomato and salsa verde. The children’s menu is free and you can order dessert, too. It’s upstairs at the Crown & Anchor Hotel in Newcastle.

Cravings returnsThe new-look Cravings Restaurant at Hotel Delany is slowly taking shapeand owner Anthony Hird couldn’t be happier with the renovations so far: “We needed it –it’s been eight years since we last renovated and everything was brown. And dark.We are trying to change our demographic by making it more of a gastro-pub but we will keep some of the pub classics.”

He hopes the restaurant will be open for business later this month.

Cheese and wineDe Iuliis Wines willhost a special dining event on Saturday, July 29:Carne e Vino. From 11am to 4.30pm there will be live music, a meat and cheese demonstration, charcuterie lunch and cheese and, of course, wine. Tickets cost $120 ($100 DeWine Club members)by phoning Emma on 4993 8000, or emailing [email protected]南京夜网.au by July 14. Transport is available.

‘I felt like I’d been shot’: First-time mum left paralysed by rare medical defect

A month on from giving birth, Samantha Bulmer’s home is a hospital room. Photo: Jorge BrancoA month on from giving birth, Samantha Bulmer’s home is a hospital room.
Nanjing Night Net

Four white walls and a bathroom, medications, trinkets, a bag in the corner, that bed that goes up and down at the touch of some buttons, a beautiful baby girl and legs that don’t work anymore.

Sometimes the muscles will cramp up, curling her body over, but she can’t feel them or move them.

Her legs clad in sloth-covered pyjama pants, sometimes they make her angry but they don’t do much else, for now at least.

The 32-year-old first-time mum’s birth horror story started on June 7. Numbness spread down her right leg, along with a shooting pain through the stomach carrying little River Lily Harlen, her soon-to-be “miracle baby”.

She didn’t know it at the time but these were the first signs of a rare defect lying dormant in her system, brought on by a pregnancy she didn’t think she would ever have.

Arteriovenousmalformations are a tangle of abnormal blood vessels, which can cause major issues with blood flow through arteries and veins.

According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, about 18 out of 100,000 people have them.

Out of that small number, only four in every 100 suffer a haemorrhage, bringing with it a 15-20 per cent risk of stroke and 30 per cent chance of brain death, with 10 per cent proving fatal.

University of Queensland neurologist Dr Alex Lehn says the location in the body is critical for the impact of an arteriovenousmalformation(AVM).

He says the problem can often go undetected for years and come and go with little or no consequence but can also be catastrophic.

“AVMs are still rare, and troublesome AVMs, the big ones, AVMs that rupture, are very rare,” he says.

Sam’s case is one of those.

As her womb grew larger, it began to pressure an artery, blocking blood flow and creating a pressure build up, which eventually burst, she says, remembering the series of violent incidents she felt in the lead-up to River’s caesarean birth.

“I felt like I’d been shot and I completely collapsed on the floor,” she says, describing the second of five attacks.

“I was screaming.”

The British-born bar staffer, who’s been in Australia for 10 years, was terrified something had happened to River and relieved “in the extreme” when she was given the all-clear.

She says it was the third such incident that left her paralysed, blood vessels bursting and causing swelling around her spine, robbing her of her ability to walk.

Samantha Bulmer is still in hospital because of her shock paralysis. Photo: Jorge Branco

“It’s started to go away but I’m not getting any feeling so it’s most likely the damage is done,” she says.

“When they spoke to me about the results from the MRI… he was telling me you’re not likely to walk again but there’s a chance you can.

“…If I can walk again, I promise I will walk again.”

Sam thought she and partner Elliot Harlen would have moved into their new house by now.

Instead, she’s still in the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, living for Saturdays when the 33-year-old logistics worker comes to visit.

“We bath River together and just do as much with her together as we can and then we just watch a movie. It’s just like being at home,” she says, her face lighting up.

“I forget sometimes that anything’s going on. You’re chatting with each other watching the tele and it’s easy to forget the reality around you.

“I just go back to normal when Elliot’s here.”

Sam says it’s a 40-minute drive each way from Browns Plains after a 12-hour workday for Elliot so a brief Wednesday evening and the extended Saturday are all they can manage.

Hair pulled back, lying back in a pink jumper, Sam is remarkably matter-of-fact, determined, when she talks about her physio, the battle to be able to walk again and care for River.

Samantha Bulmer and daughter River. Photo: Jorge Branco

It’s only when she thinks about what happens if the feeling and movement in her legs never come back that emotion overwhelms her briefly.

“I feel like I can face this and deal with it in my mind temporarily,” she says, eyes shining with tears on the verge of spilling over.

“If it was like one year and you’re going to get better, I feel like I can deal with it.

“But at the moment, I’m struggling with facing it, my whole life, that’s the hardest thing.”

The whole time her mum’s talking, River plays quietly, cooing with the hospital volunteer who comes in most mornings to give mum a break.

“Today she’s just been really fussy, wanting to have cuddles with me. She’s perfect,” Sam says.

From now, it’s about recovery. Sam is hoping for a transfer to the Princess Alexandra Hospital’s dedicated centre but acknowledges months of rehab awaits.

In the meantime,she’s hoping to raise enough money through an online fundraiserto fly family over from England to help support her when she gets out.

Eli teaches rivals a lesson

WINNER: Eli Richardson at the Eastern University Games last week. The former Pacific Dunes trainee won the event to earn a start at the national university games on the Gold Coast in September.Former Pacific Dunes trainee Eli Richardson will head to the Gold Coast in September for the Australian University Games after winning the qualifying tournament last week.
Nanjing Night Net

The 27-year-oldstopped his traineeship two years ago to start a primary school teaching degree at Newcastle University but continues to play weekly competition golf.

He shot 75-75-76-75 at Waratah and Merewether to win the Eastern University Games title by eight shots from University of Technology Sydney’sLachie Robinson.

Wollongong’s James Anderson was another five shots back in third, and Charlestown’s Bryce Pickin, the tournament’s lowhandicapper at -0.3, was fourth.

Richardson,who plays off scratch, was part of Pacific Dunes’ winning A-grade division-two pennant team in March after recovering his amateur status at the end of 2016.He beat Muree’s Peter Gardiner 5&3 in the final.

University games have a reputation for placing as much importance on socialising as sport, but Richardson said the golf tournament was reasonably serious.

“It was pretty good, because there was quite a few low markers who played, a couple of guys from The Australian, so it was a pretty strong field,” he said.

“It wasn’t just a Mickey Mouse thing. Some of them were, but there was a few people who were actually trying to win it.”

He said he had no regrets about ending his traineeship.

“I was really enjoying the teaching side of it, but the pro shop side was a bit boring,” he said.

“I was running all the junior clinics at Pacific Dunes and enjoyed that, and primary teaching was something that I always wanted to do, so I ended up enrolling.

“I always wanted to get more into the teaching side of it.

“I think the reality of trying to make a playing career out of it is a bit of a fantasy unless you’re a superstar these days.”

*****

Queenslander Jed Morgan was head and shoulders above the rest of the NSW Junior Championship field at Shelly Beach and Toukley last week, defending his title by 14 shots.

Morgan wonthe Asia-Pacific Golf Confederation Junior Championships in Taiwan inAugust to secure a start in a professional event on the Japanesetour.

The country’s top-ranked junior also won the Singapore Junior and Northern Territory Open in 2016 and blitzed the Queensland Junior by seven shots two weeks ago, including a final-round 63 at Bargara.

Morgan finished at 11 under over four rounds last week and was the only player under par. Branxton’s Corey Lamb was the best of the Hunter contingent in a tie for 11th at nineover.

Toronto’s Jacob Dundas came closeto a state age title in the 13-years division but lost in a play-off to Ali Rachid (Bardwell Valley).

Centenary of the Great War

SOLEMN: Unveiling the memorial to the 1st Australian Division at Pozieres, France, July 8, 1917. Photo courtesy of Juan Mahony.Newcastle Morning Herald transcriptions and Hunter Valley enlistment and death details for9-15 July 1917.
Nanjing Night Net

AUSTRALIAN CASUALTIES Two Australian casualty lists, Nos. 321 and 322, were issued Wednesday. They show that 259 were killed in action, 36 died of wounds, one was accidentally killed, and seven died of other causes. There are 1529 reported wounded, 53 sick, 11 missing, nine injured, and one POW.

AUSTRALIANS IN EGYPTDespatches from Major-General Sir Archibald Murray, who was in command in Egypt, covering from October 1, 1916, to February 28, 1917, mentions 120 Australians and 43 New Zealanders. The despatches are largely concerned with the doings of Australian and New Zealand mounted men.Sir Archibald Murray specially comments on the Australian Light Horse in their difficult night marches in the country round Oghara on October 13; also the Australian and New Zealand mounted men in their skilful occupation of El Arish and Masmi on December 20, ending with Chauvel’s fine march to Magdhaba, where 1282 prisoners were taken, while we lost only 154 killed and wounded in a brilliant dash.The New Zealand mounted men mentioned include Chetwode’s column, advancing on Rafa on January 9, which was the outstanding feature of the action, which resulted in the capture of the entire Turkish force of 1600 men. The main factor in the success of conquering the Sinai Desert was the intense work. Hundreds of miles of road and railways had been built.

OPERATIONS IN PALESTINEAn official report from Egypt states the situation is unchanged. There has been considerable artillery work. We put out of action 13 enemy guns during June, and destroyed many gun emplacements.The health of the troops is satisfactory, and the admission to hospitals shows the lowest average for Egypt since five years before the war.It is learned from Turkish sources that the Turks are making great preparations to retake Bagdad and to defend Palestine. Ten new divisions are being formed, seven for Asia, under a General Marshal.

MEMORIAL TO AUSTRALIANSAustralians visiting the Somme have expressed general approval of the idea which is crystallising in London to erect a permanent memorial near Pozieres to the fallen Australians.At present crosses mark isolated graves and little cemeteries. There are also larger temporary memorials to divisions, but the feeling favours the erection of a noble national memorial.

NEATH SOLDIER’S LETTERPrivate Ernest Pockett, writing to Mr and MrsPockett, of Neath, from France, under date April 14, says: “This is Friday, the 14th April, and everything OK. The weather is getting better now, although we had a good fall of snow on Wednesday. I suppose Mrs. Morgan has heard of the bad news concerning George Hammond. Jack Mansfield told me again today, so it seems to be correct. We have been having a few casualties lately. I am at present having a good old rest, which I badly needed. We spent the winter on the worst part of the western front, and have been going hard at it. I have not seen a civilian for five months, so you can guess how we need a change. Our battalion was the first through Bapaume, and I worked harder that day than ever I worked carrying messages for twenty four hours through a town which was stopping a fair amount of shells, etc. All the Neath chaps are keeping well, and I am in the best of health” This letter was written and sent to Australia on a German field post-card.

PATERSON SOLDIER’S LETTERMrs Priestley, of ‘Gostwyck’, Paterson, has received a letter from an officer of the battalion of which her late son, Private George Priestley, was a member. After referring to the regret he felt when he heard of the death of Private Priestley, the officer says that prior to his promotion he was alongside the deceased soldier during the Gallipoli campaign. He goes on to say: “He was a good soldier, but above all he was a man. He always led such a clean life, and was a God-fearing man. I was with him such a lot, that I am very intimate with all his doings. He was sniped over the parapet, and died instantly. “We buried him and erected a cross to his memory, all amongst the snow.”

FOOTBALLERS AT THE FRONTNinety names are on the South Newcastle Rugby League Football Club’s roll of honour, which was unveiled Wednesday night at a euchre party and social held in the Oddfellows’ Hall, Auckland-street. There was a large attendance. Of those whose names appear on the roll 11 have made the supreme sacrifice.Mr A. R. Gardiner, MP, who performed the unveiling ceremony, said it was most gratifying to know that those young men had so numerously responded to the call of duty from the club. It spoke well for the patriotism of the club, and he believed that in the future further names would be added to that long list. It was pleasing also to the relatives of the men to know that their friends had shown in this way their appreciation of their action

MEREWETHER CLUBDistrict Soccerites will regret to know that Private A. Jones has been killed at the front. Arthur Jones, popularly called ‘Mick’,was a member of Merewether Advance Club, and prior to the war played with Merewether juniors, being regarded by many as a player of great promise. Privates Fred Alberts and J. (‘Shot’) Jones, two other members of Merewether Club, have been wounded. The official intimation did not state if seriously or otherwise. Alberts was the State’s best centre-forward. He had represented the district on numerous occasions, and in the last State game he led NSWagainst Queensland. ‘Shot’ Jones was in Merewether B team last season, playing inside right, with Alberts centre forward. He played against South Maitland, at Blackburn’s oval last season, and if memory serves right, ‘Shot’ shot Newcastle’s only goal on that day.

CHARLESTOWNThe first local soldier arrived home on Thursday evening. Fully 30 residents journeyed to Newcastle by the motor omnibus to meet the Sydney train and give a hearty welcome to Private Boyd, and were pleased to find him looking little the worse for his experience, although his left arm had not regained its usual strength. On the arrival at Charlestown a crowd was waiting to shake him by the hand, and escorted him to his home. The patriotic committee are arranging a public welcome to Private Boyd.

LAMBTON POLICE COURTLieutenant Clegg appeared to prosecute William Cleary and Alfred Williams, trainees, for absenting themselves from drill, the former having a deficiency of 5½ days, and the latter 6¼ days. The magistrate ordered that they be handed over to the Military authorities at South Head, Sydney, for 6 and 8 days, respectively, and to pay 3 shillings costs of court, in default, 24 hours in the lock-up. A similar case against John James Taylor was ordered to be dealt with in the Children’s Court.

ENLISTMENTSTheodore James Bradstreet, Newcastle; John Donald Collins, West Wallsend; George Alfred Duffy, Murrurundi; George Duncan, Boolambyte; John Patrick Falvey, Islington; Mathew Fitz, Newcastle; Jack Charles Fraser, Mayfield; Frederick Hinde, East Maitland; Vivian Arthur Johnson, Cessnock; John Albert Lloyd, Merewether; Robert Maddison, Newcastle; William Jethro Maskell, Hamilton; William Mitchell, Kurri Kurri; Cyril Claude Mosely, Weston; William Pentelow, Kurri Kurri; George Reid, Cooks Hill; William Campbell Ross, Stockton; Patrick Scully, Carrington; Archibald Hamilton Shields, Newcastle; George Skilton, Stockton; Robert Bruce Smith, Newcastle; Lovel Thomas Stead, Tighes Hill; Horace George Taylor, Belltrees; Thomas Weedy, West Maitland.

DEATHSPte Robert Brown, South Cessnock; Pte Charles John Clark, Broadmeadow; Pte James Joseph Colgate, Neath; Pte William Hunt, Newcastle; Pte Harold Johnson, Scone; Pte John Morris, Newcastle; Pte Albert Edward Robertson, Newcastle; L/Sgt Ivan Rossoggsky, Moonan Flat; Pte John Joseph Thomas, Weston.

David Dial OAM is a Hunter-based military historian. facebook南京夜网/HunterValleyMilitaryHistory

Google’s home technology company Nest Labs launches in Australia

Google Nest is more aesthetically pleasing than other products on the market.Just as a new animatedThe Jetsonsmovie goes into production, a sliver of that future arrives today with home security camera vision you can watch on your smartphone, and technology that allows you to shout at a burglar – or your dog – even when you’re far away.
Nanjing Night Net

Google’s US3.2 billion company Nest Labs has finally brought the first four of its safety and security products to Australia as the “lucky 13th” country, and the first in the Asia-Pacific region, in its international roll-out.

“They’ve been very well-received elsewhere and we’ve found people aren’t looking for a whole-home automated system,” says Maxime Veron, Nest’s director of product marketing. “Instead, they’re shopping for the best product to solve a problem they feel they may have at their house, and are connecting them one product at a time to make themselves feel more secure.”

The products that will now be for sale locally – through the company’s new eCommerce store iSelect – include both indoor and outdoor cameras, taking footage stored on Cloud, which will be available even if a thief has the wherewithal to steal the camera.

It can be watched online and send an alert to your phone if it sees anything suspicious, you can talk back to your home through your phone and there’s also an advanced feature that can recognise a person talking or a dog barking.

A smoke and carbon monoxide alarm will also be for sale, which can tell the home-owner where the danger is with a vocal alert, or send a message to the phone if they’re out.

Maxime Veron pictured with a Google Nest security camera, which is new to Australia. Photo: Ben Rushton

While similar products are already available on the market from other companies, these Nest devices are likely to claim a good slice of the business, believes John Gallel, vice-president of the Australian Security Industry Association, and general manager of security company Kastle Systems Australia.

“There are similar products out there and there have been for some time,” Gallel says. “But the Nest ones are appealing in that they are aesthetically pleasing – similar smoke detectors can be two or two-and-a-half-times their size and a bit ugly – and they’re easy to use. Good design is their competitive advantage.”

That has always been a key aim of the company, says Veron, with Nest started by iPod inventor Tony Faddell and many of the early staff coming over from Apple. In addition, the devices connect well as long as there is internet available, and particularly NBN.

Australia is the first country in the Asia-Pacific region to have access to Google Nest. Photo: Supplied

They do have limitations, however. Nest’s smoke alarms probably couldn’t have averted London’s Grenfell tower block disaster since there’s not yet the capacity to wire up and connect a whole apartment building to a central alarm system; they’re mostly for use with a standalone home.

“But in Australia, there are around 200,000 residential fires happening every year and that’s a lot,” says Veron. “For a home owner they’d have an early warning that something was happening, and you’d know whether it was a fire or just someone burning the toast.”

Whether Australians are as security-conscious as Americans is another debatable point. “But every year in Australia there are over 400,000 home incidents, whether burglaries or vandalism, and people often have a dog, or bars over their windows, or fences or walls to protect them,” Veron says.

“The main reason we are selling so many Nest Cams, day in day out, is so people can see what’s happening with their most precious asset, especially with the high cost of real estate. That peace of mind is very valuable.”

Nest security products that are being launched in the Australian market. Photo: Ben Rushton

When Warner Bros’ newThe Jetsonsmovie is released it’ll be interesting to see if it also makes over traditional products like smoke alarms and cameras, rather than opting for terribly futuristic solutions like technological force fields.

Because those regular forms of home securityhave their advantages. Sometimes the cameras themselves are deterrents, Veron says, police are more likely to race to a scene when you can tell them a burglar is currently rifling your safe, and the camera vision has been used in court cases.

And with Australians having a reputation as early adopters of new technology, as the products become more refined and early bugs are ironed out, maybe the smart home revolution for all is finally on its way.

‘No light rail blowout’

PREMIER’S PITCH: NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian speaking at a Hunter Business Chamber meeting about the 2017-8 state budget on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De PeakNewcastle’s light rail project will be delivered withinbudget, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian saidduringa visit to the city on Tuesday.
Nanjing Night Net

It comes after the Newcastle Herald reported on Monday that Labor Newcastle MP Tim Crakanthorp believed the state government was “hiding something” after it refused his freedom of information request for documents related to the cost of the project.

When asked on Tuesday whether she could assure the community thatlight rail would be delivered within budget, she responded: “Of course”.

“Not just that, I wish he [Mr Crakanthorp] and others would get on board because every time I come up here the community is so enthusiastic and excited about that.

“The most frequent thing I get about the light rail is ‘can you expand it?We want to see it go further,’ and that’s certainly what we are looking at.”

Ms Berejiklian was in Newcastle to address a Hunter Business Chamber meeting after the 2017-18 budget, which was handed down last month.

Critics of the Berejiklian government’s first budget said it lacked new spending in the Hunter andmoney earmarked for the region was largely for ongoing projects like the light railand new Maitland Hospital.

The Premier told the chamber meeting on Tuesdaythat the government was focused on record spending in health and education and that “a strong Hunter –a strong Newcastle –is so vital toa strong NSW”.

“What excites me more than anything, as the Premier of NSW, is allowing each region to reach its full potential,” Ms Berejikliansaid.

“Perhaps what frustrates me more than anything is people who would prefer us to sit back and do nothing and not change anything because if you don’t do anything, you’re not going to change circumstances.

“You need to have a proactive agenda, you need to be very clear on where you’re going and you need to bring the community with you.”

Hunter Business Chamber CEO Bob Hawes said the region had good qualifications to respond to the “certainty” in investment and outcomes that the government was building.

Earlier, Ms Berejiklian visitedTorontoto inspectthe newly opened police station.

Taste of Jamaica in town

FUNKY FUSION: Winnie’s Jamaican at Finnegan’s Hotel introduces Newcastle to classic Caribbean dishes in a colourful and comfortable space right in the heart of town.Winnie’s Jamaican restaurant, at Finnegan’s Hotel on the corner of King and Darby,is breaking new ground in Newcastle with a funky fusion of mouthwatering Caribbean cuisine.
Nanjing Night Net

Riffing off the Rastafarian Ital diet withloads of vegie and vegan options and also boasting classic staples like jerk chicken and goat curry, Winnie’s is the brainchild of chef Jamie Thomas.

Born in North London, Jamie grew up immersed inJamaican food and culture.

“I was cooking Jamaican food with my best mate’s mum and his family since I was a baby,” Jamie said.

“I’ve never known anything different and as I’ve grown older I’ve dug deeper into the cuisine and culture.”

Jamie is passionateabout introducing the Hunter to this style of food.

“Jamaica has been this cosmopolitan place historically for centuries, so the food is really diverse, got great kick and super healthy,” Jamie said.

“There’s Spanish, English, French, Chinese and even Japanese influences.

“A lot of the dishes are grilled while the Rasta Ital diet is almost vegan in approach, avoiding processed food, additives, oil, salt and sugar –so it has that vegie dimension that will appeal too.

“From a chef point of view, you can give nearly any food a Jamaican twist and not crucify the fusion factor.”

Jamie moved up to the Hunter last year having run Queenie’s Jamaican restaurant at The Forresters Hotel in Surry Hills for 5 years.

He has partnered with best mate Luke Smith under the heading Two Poms Pty Ltd.

Luke is running the kitchen at Town Hall Hotel in Waratah, while Jamie, havingspent last year delivering dude foodat the transformative Family Hotel on Hunter Street,has set up Winnie’s at Finnegan’s.

“Newcastle is always looking to try something new and I thinkNovocastrians will love Jamaican food,” he said.

Finnegan’s has shifted focus from Irish themes in recent years but Jamie still sees symmetries.

“There’s a massive Irish culture in Jamaica, the locals drink loads of Guinnessand both peoples are happy go lucky and love a celebration,” he said.

“I think most Novocastrians will relate to that.”

Visitors to Winnie’s will discover a bright, comfortable space withgreat food, awesome music and laid-back vibe.

Winnie’s Jamaican operatesTuesday to Friday for lunch (12-3pm)and dinner (6pm-9pm) and Saturday for dinner from 6pm till late.

“I’ll play Saturday by ear because we’re right in the entertainment hub of the city –the perfect place to meet, eat and kick on,” Jamie said.

“The bottom line is if people are hungry, I’ll be cooking.”

For more info, visit www.finneganshotel南京夜网.au.

Robson’s perfect panache

FEWpeople, I believe, have matched the passion, persistence, panache and pursuit of perfection of Murray Robson in his 47 years in Hunter wine.
Nanjing Night Net

Murray, who died aged 85 on July 26, was ever the innovator, renowned for his exemplary wines with their hand-signatured labels. He was a three-time “founding father” of what are now the prestigious Davis family Briar Ridge and Pepper Tree operations and the Agnew group’s Audrey Wilkinson brand.

He was the first Hunter winegrower to plant roses at the end of vine rows as an early indicator of disease and the first to build vineyard cottage accommodation.

In 1969, as a teetotaller and a 10-year partner in the exclusive Double Bay menswear Squire Shop, he came to the Hunter in a syndicate of 20 Sydney business and professional men that bought the remnants of the Wilkinson family’s historic Oakdale vineyard and winery in De Beyers Rd, reviving the vines and launching the Audrey Wilkinson brand.

Enchanted by the wine country, Murray quit the Oakdale group in 1971 and he and his Squire Shop partners bought land in Mount View Rd, Mount View. There Murray built a guest cottage and, deciding it would be nice to see vines, in 1972 began planting a vineyard.

Initially called Squire Vineyard, it had its inaugural vintage in 1975 and promptly won a Brisbane Wine Show chardonnay gold medal. Totally hooked on wine, Murray sold out of the Squire Shop, took ownership of Mount View – renaming it Murray Robson Wines and making it synonymous with prized, hand-made wines of immaculate quality.

Heartache, however, hit with receivership in 1987 and the vineyard and winery were renamed Briar Ridge and bought by geologist-turned-vigneron Dr John Davis.

Ousted from Mount View, Murray in 1990 re-established Murray Robson Wines at Halls Rd and Oakdale-Audrey Wilkinson, taking former chairman of the Fairfax media group, James Fairfax, as an equity partner.In 1994 Murray sold his stake to James Fairfax, keeping ownership of his brand and preparing its third incarnation by buying eight hectares of Old North Rd, Rothbury, land. There he and wife Lynley built a home, winery and vineyard and in 1997 relaunched Murray Robson wines. The property was sold in 2000, but Murray was kept busy with wine exports, judging at the 2005-2006 North West Wine Summit in Atlanta and advising on the Peppertree vineyard upgrade.

Just before his death he was planning an on-line wine venture called Robson Store House.

Robson’s perfect panache

FEWpeople, I believe, have matched the passion, persistence, panache and pursuit of perfection of Murray Robson in his 47 years in Hunter wine.
Nanjing Night Net

Murray, who died aged 85 on July 26, was ever the innovator, renowned for his exemplary wines with their hand-signatured labels. He was a three-time “founding father” of what are now the prestigious Davis family Briar Ridge and Pepper Tree operations and the Agnew group’s Audrey Wilkinson brand.

He was the first Hunter winegrower to plant roses at the end of vine rows as an early indicator of disease and the first to build vineyard cottage accommodation.

In 1969, as a teetotaller and a 10-year partner in the exclusive Double Bay menswear Squire Shop, he came to the Hunter in a syndicate of 20 Sydney business and professional men that bought the remnants of the Wilkinson family’s historic Oakdale vineyard and winery in De Beyers Rd, reviving the vines and launching the Audrey Wilkinson brand.

Enchanted by the wine country, Murray quit the Oakdale group in 1971 and he and his Squire Shop partners bought land in Mount View Rd, Mount View. There Murray built a guest cottage and, deciding it would be nice to see vines, in 1972 began planting a vineyard.

Initially called Squire Vineyard, it had its inaugural vintage in 1975 and promptly won a Brisbane Wine Show chardonnay gold medal. Totally hooked on wine, Murray sold out of the Squire Shop, took ownership of Mount View – renaming it Murray Robson Wines and making it synonymous with prized, hand-made wines of immaculate quality.

Heartache, however, hit with receivership in 1987 and the vineyard and winery were renamed Briar Ridge and bought by geologist-turned-vigneron Dr John Davis.

Ousted from Mount View, Murray in 1990 re-established Murray Robson Wines at Halls Rd and Oakdale-Audrey Wilkinson, taking former chairman of the Fairfax media group, James Fairfax, as an equity partner.In 1994 Murray sold his stake to James Fairfax, keeping ownership of his brand and preparing its third incarnation by buying eight hectares of Old North Rd, Rothbury, land. There he and wife Lynley built a home, winery and vineyard and in 1997 relaunched Murray Robson wines. The property was sold in 2000, but Murray was kept busy with wine exports, judging at the 2005-2006 North West Wine Summit in Atlanta and advising on the Peppertree vineyard upgrade.

Just before his death he was planning an on-line wine venture called Robson Store House.

A taste of Nashville, Aussie style

A taste of Nashville, Aussie style Clare Bowen at the Civic Theatre, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. July 10, 2017.
Nanjing Night Net

Clare Bowen at the Civic Theatre, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. July 10, 2017. Brandon Robert Young at right.

Clare Bowen at the Civic Theatre, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. July 10, 2017.

Clare Bowen at the Civic Theatre, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. July 10, 2017.

Clare Bowen at the Civic Theatre, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. July 10, 2017.

Clare Bowen at the Civic Theatre, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. July 10, 2017.

TweetFacebookNashville, saved from deathlast year by a financial bailout from CMT network, the state of Tennessee and the city of Nashville, has cultivated an international fanbase thatloves the lives of characters in the country music soap opera.

Enter Clare Bowen, an Australian actor who plays Scarlett O’Connor on the show. The lithesome 33-year-old spends the off-season from filming the show touring the world as a singer.

She boundedonto the stage at the Civic as a spritely fairy, barefoot with feathers in her hair and so many stories to tell and songs to sing. Filling the stalls of the Civic, her audience was thoroughly engaged, locked in for close contact.

Bowen didnot disappoint. She mixes it up:songs from the show, a few of her own, a fiercesome medley of country classics and some tunes by her leading man (and fiance) Brandon Robert Young, who’s five feet away from her all night long.

Bowen had the luxury of a full band, including lead guitarist (and Australian) Oliver Thorpe and keyboard player (and Australian) Daren Sirbough, who both got in some tasty licks.

Young was outstanding on vocals. While Bowen voiced her love for him several times on stage, it clear to all there was much to like about his vocal talent. His only solowas possibly the best song of the night.

My biggest criticism would have to be the poor sound mix on a handful ofsongs: the wall of “Nashville sound” overwhelmed Bowen’s delicatevoice too many times, most noticably on Ave’s Song and Doors & Corridors.

Bowen’s voice has plenty of range, absolutely shining on Black Roses, a highlight of the night, as well as This Town.

It was really the combination of her life storytelling and songs that connected the crowd. And hers truly is a story of defying the odds, beating cancer as a child, and succeeding in the competitive world of American show business.

How can you be untouched by a singer who tells the best piece of advice her mama ever told her was “don’t let nobody kick dust on your sparkles”.

The encore was quick and to the point, finishing the night with The Sound of Love and A Life That’s Good.

ATM card skim warning

Scammers abound. Photo: Getty ImagesATM users have been warned to stay vigilant and protect their details after unconfirmed reports of skimming devices found on cash machines.
Nanjing Night Net

Weekend Facebook posts alleged two devices had been discovered on automatic teller machines at the ANZ and Commonwealth Bank sites in Sturt St, Ballarat, but neither police nor banks had received reports of unauthorised withdrawals or customer losses late yesterday.

“While we are not aware of any skimming activity at this location, ANZ ATMs are equipped with anti-skimming features and we will be monitoring for suspicious card activity,” an ANZ spokesman said.

The Commonwealth Bank also investigated but found no record of illegal activity.

“We can confirm there was no skimming device placed on the CBA ATM in Sturt Street, Ballarat,” a spokesperson said.

“Security of our customers’ banking details is a top priority.”

Most commonly, skimming machines read and record the magnetic strip of a card when placed through a false slot on the ATM, and a small camera records the keystrokes of the customer entering their PIN.

Criminals then remove the devices and download the data which can be used to make unauthorised transactions on a customer’s account.

Most devices are highly sophisticated and difficult for the untrained eye to detect, but covering your PIN number when entering it on the keypad is one of the easiest ways to prevent your account being hacked as both inputs are needed for criminals to access an account.

Representatives of both banks said scams and illegal activity could occur from time to time, but assured customers they were covered with full reimbursement of funds taken in unauthorised transactions.

“ANZ will cover any losses for our customers who are victims of fraud, including card skimming, provided they have not contributed to the fraud in any way,” the ANZ spokesman said.

The Commonwealth Bank advised ensuring no one could see you entering your PIN when using the ATM.

“To protect your PIN details, cover your hand when entering your PIN at an ATM and bediscreet when withdrawing cash.”

Checking your bank account and credit card statements for transactions you cannot explain, and reporting them to your bank, is also key to halting credit card fraud.

The Courier, Ballarat

Mojo back and funky

NEW DIRECTION: Mojo Juju has collaborated with Newcastle producer Jamieson Shaw on her new single Think Twice.ONE-TIME Newcastle musician Mojo Juju has never been afraid of testing new musical frontiers.
Nanjing Night Net

She’s done everything from punk and cabaret with her rotating Novocastrian outfit The Snake Oil Merchants to jazz, swamp blues and soul through her two-album solo career.

The Melbourne-based Juju has taken another radical turn, teaming up with Novocastrian producer Jamieson Shaw, for a funky dance number,Think Twice.

Shaw has been in hot demand since working as senior music editor on Baz Luhrmann’s ill-fated Netflix series, The Get Down.

Only a small sample of the single has been released, but Think Twice shows Juju embracing back beats and a more contemporary pop vibe. Think Twice will be released on August 1, followed by her third album in 2018.

To celebrate the new single Juju is doing her first national tour in a year and she performs at her old stomping ground, the Cambridge Hotel, on August 25.

BRIGHT PRAISE BIG WRAP: Brightness has received a rave review from US music site Pitchfork.

NEWCASTLE multi-instrumentalist Alex Knight, aka Brightness, could potentially break into the massive American indie market after receiving a rave album review from highly-respected US music site Pitchfork this week.

Knight’s firstalbumTeething received a 7.4 rating out of 10 and reviewerShaad D’Souza wrote,“It’s a dry, beautiful debut that pushes beyond ’90s indie rock trappings and into rougher, more interesting terrain.”

Knight said he was“in high spirits” following the review. However, it might be more than his spirits that soar following the glowing praise.

Pitchfork is the world’s most popular online indie music-focused publication and boasts a daily readership of240,000.

END FOR BENFORMER Silverchair drummer Ben Gillies haslaunched into the final stagesof a new solo album he hopes to release later this year.

The 37-year-old was back homeon Mondayto attend his wife Jackie Gillies’ civic ceremony at Fort Scratchley where she received the key to the city from Newcastle Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes.

Gillies flewto Byron Bay following the reception to add the finishing touches to his debut solo album. It follows his previous post-Silverchair release with former act Bento.

BOO SEEKA TOURTHERE aren’t many more hotly-anticipated local releases for 2017 than Boo Seeka’s long-awaited debut albumNever Too Soonon August 4.Naturally, the electronic soul duo’s accompanying album tour is equally anticipated.

Newcastle’s Ben Gumbleton and Sydney producer Sam Croft are hitting the road in spring and perform at the Cambridge Hotel on October 21.Last year Boo Seekasold out the venue, so expect history to repeat.

ROCKIN’ ARGYLERAAVE Tapes like taking indie rock into places it rarely sees the light of day.

Last year they launched their self-titled debut EP at renown dance nightclub the King Street Hotel. The venue sold out and punters were lined up in the street.

On August 20 The Newcastle three-piece are taking their music to arguably the city’s most iconic nightclub, Argyle Houseor as we remember it, Fanny’s. Raave Tapes aren’t going alone. The evening will featuremusic across three stages from 20 acts.

BROUHAHA BREWSADELAIDE roots musicianKelly Brouhaha has sacrificed plenty to follow her dreams.

In the three yearssince her last release, Brouhaha has left an unhappy marriage and her mortgage behind to travelaround Australia, sleeping in her van while on tour.

Brouhaha’s van rolls into Hamilton’s The Commons next Thursday where she’ll unveil her new singleAs Long As There’s A Smile.

COLOURFUL ENDAMERICAN melodic hardcore band Outline In Colour arecoming to Islington’s Small Ballroom on September 24, the final show of their seven-date Australian tour.

The five-piece from Tulsaspectacularly sacked their vocalistK.C. Simonsenin December and outlinedalcohol abuse and his accusations of financial mismanagement by other band members asreasons for his departure in an incredibly detailed and honestFacebook post.

Outline In Colour have since reunited with their original vocalistJonathan Grimes.

DIRECT HIT MADEOUTLINE In Colour aren’t the only angry young American band coming to Newcastle this spring.Milwaukee punk quartet Direct Hit will play the Hamilton Station Hotel on September 1 with EbolagoldfishandHackTheMainframeduring their first Australian tour.The prolific rockers have recorded five albums since 2012, including this year’s Domesplitter and their first internationally-successful release Wasted Mind (2016).

Williamtown residents applaud Oakey class action

Williamtown residents applaud Oakey class action Questions: An open drain at Williamtown, near the RAAF Base. Williamtown residents have welcomed a class action by Oakey in Queensland over fire fighting foam contamination, after Williamtown launched its case in November.
Nanjing Night Net

Defence: The Department of Defence is now facing two class actions from Williamtown and Oakey residents over the spread of fire fighting foam contamination from bases in both areas.

TweetFacebookNewcastle Heraldrevealed a world-leading expert on contaminants at the centre of the Williamtown scandal said it was “possible and indeed probable” the chemicals are carcinogenic.

The Heraldseries also revealed water in a drain at the centre of cluster fears near the Williamtown RAAF Base had staggering levels of the chemicals, and at least 24 people who had lived along Cabbage Tree Road had developed cancer in the past 15 years.

The Oakey legal case isbelieved to be the second Australian class action over fire fighting foam contaminants perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) after 400 Williamtown residents launched a class action through Gadens Lawyers in November.

More than 100 American communities are involved in class actions against fire fighting foam manufacturers and users.

“This action and the Williamtown action will pave the way to justice for those communities which have suffered,” Shine Lawyers special counsel Peter Shannon said in a statement before the formal announcement at Toowoomba on Tuesday.

“In Oakey hundreds of innocent families have been, and continue to be, exposed. Many have invested everything they have into this town and now all their hard work means nothing. They’re effectively trapped and can’t sell their properties or move their kids out of the contamination zone,” he said.

“The community has suffered under this cloud of contamination for years with no end in sight until now. Today marks the first step towards justice for the people of Oakey.”

Williamtown and Surrounds Residents Action Group spokesperson Rhianna Gorfine said the news was “fantastic”.

“Williamtown and surrounds welcomes the news of Oakey’s official class action proceedings. All affected communities by Defence contamination stand together for justice,” Ms Gorfine said.

“We renew our call for the government to help the affected communities immediately, to give the residents a future and not put us all through a lengthy court battle.

“The government can start with settlement proceedings right now.”

The Oakey case alleges toxic fire fighting foam chemicals have spread from the Oakey Defence base to nearby land, water and food sources, and into people’s blood streams.

“While we believe this is the worst contamination site in Australia, there are more than 60 Defence bases around the country which have exposed locals to the same toxic chemicals,” Mr Shannon said.

Mr Shannon said he expected the Federal Court would consult with the residentsgroup’s lawyers and lawyers for the Department of Defence in a few weeks to establish a plan for how the case will be heard.

The Department of Defence will be expected to file its defence within the next few months.

Philippe Grandjean,an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health, and world-leading expert on the fire fighting foam chemicals, said they can suppressthe body’s immune system.

When asked whether that could be one way exposure to thechemicals could lead to increased rates ofcancer, Professor Grandjean said it was “entirely possible”.

“With immune dysfunction, the body does not pick up the abnormal cells that are spreading and developing into a cancer,” he said.

Professor Grandjean said population studies had not been conducted on a large enough scale to make a judgement about cancer, but his gut reaction was that people should minimise their exposure to the chemicals as much as possible.